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42Evolution

Far Horizons

Love in a time of Prozac; how did our emotions evolve?

Der Liebeskranke Antiochus by Johann Anwander (1715-1770), portraying the lovesick king Antiochus; ruler of the Seleucid empire (now modern Syria) from 281-261 BC.  In his novel Love in the time of Cholera author Gabriel Garcia Marquez explores the notion that lovesickness is literally an illness whose effects on the body are comparable to those of cholera.  The word ‘choleric’ in English means depressed, irritable and angry, and in Marquez’ native Spanish, cólera can also denote passion, rage and ire.  The metaphor illustrates the power our emotions have to affect our physical body and mental processes (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Der Liebeskranke Antiochus by Johann Anwander (1715-1770), portraying the lovesick king Antiochus; ruler of the Seleucid empire (now modern Syria) from 281-261 BC. In his novel Love in the time of Cholera author Gabriel Garcia Marquez explores the notion that lovesickness is literally an illness whose effects on the body are comparable to those of cholera. The word ‘choleric’ in English means depressed, irritable and angry, and in Marquez’ native Spanish, cólera can also denote passion, rage and ire. The metaphor illustrates the power our emotions have to affect our physical body and mental processes (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

“His examination revealed that [the patient] had no fever, no pain anywhere, and that his only concrete feeling was an urgent desire to die. All that was needed was shrewd questioning… to conclude once again that the symptoms of love were the same as those of cholera…”

[Gabriel Garcia Marquez]


‘Lovesickness’ is considered by some doctors, and sometimes their patients, to be a disease. The experience of lost, rejected or unrequited romantic love can provoke depression, sleeplessness, chest pains, loss of appetite, and various digestive disorders. Conversely, being in love can bring a state of elation and joy.

The euphoric feelings associated with ‘falling in love’ are produced by a chemical. Its name is phenylethylamine, and it is a natural amphetamine whose effects on our brain and nervous system are quite similar to cocaine. As a consequence, it may provoke addiction-like symptoms.

Phenylethylamine, along with other pleasure-inducing compounds such as dopamine and the endorphins, are used for communication between cells in all animals, plants, fungi and even bacteria. This implies that cellular life is chemically wired for ‘pleasure’.

During evolution these signals were co-opted for transmission and processing of complex information. In animals they have found a highly specialised role; to relay messages between nerve cells, and so serve as ‘neurotransmitters’. Finally, in ourselves and in mammals, they are associated with what we understand as ‘feelings’, or emotions, including love, safety and trust.

We share a repertoire of primary, ‘basic’ simple emotions with other mammals.  Human perceptions of emotions however are highly complex, and this is reflected by the words we may choose to describe them (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

We share a repertoire of primary, ‘basic’ simple emotions with other mammals. Human perceptions of emotions however are highly complex, and this is reflected by the words we may choose to describe them (Image: Wikim... moreedia Commons)

Whilst some mammals pair-bond for only a single breeding season, others mate for life. The way their (and our) neural systems use these pleasure-provoking chemicals has a profound influence on the strength of these bonds.These signals, referred to by Candace Pert as the ‘molecules of emotion’, entwine our whole body with the emotional experience. The sensations these molecules communicate allow us to ‘feel our feelings’ and to ‘make sense’ of the information they bring.

All primates are neurally hard-wired for social connection. Even so, humans are unusual. Our mirror neuron network, which interlinks with our emotionally responsive neural circuits, enables us to ‘mirror’ the emotional and physiological experiences of others.

This runs through all types of human interactions, direct or indirect, such as when we read, hear or think of the words and actions of others. Hence our emotions can arise independently of our immediate circumstances, such as when a distant memory suddenly surfaces or we anticipate a future event.

This difference underpins the distinctively human capacity to consciously craft enduring love relationships. Human romances may end when the initial phenylethylamine-associated euphoria passes, or may mature into a richer companionship, incorporating different forms of friendship, affection and intimacy. These various love interactions are co-created by the participants; each and every relationship between two human beings is unique.

Phenylethylamine, produced in the body from the amino acid phenylalanine, is a natural amphetamine.  This chemical family includes many mood-altering drugs including stimulants, hypnotics and antidepressants.  These compounds are highly addictive (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Phenylethylamine, produced in the body from the amino acid phenylalanine, is a natural amphetamine. This chemical family includes many mood-altering drugs including stimulants, hypnotics and antidepressants. These compo... moreunds are highly addictive (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Evolution suggests that, as in other animals, our emotional response system (including our capacity for ‘love’) is a behavioural adaptation that has been selected and refined across the aeons. This implies that our human capacity for ‘love’ has also evolved through selection, and accordingly might be an adaptation.

What are the effects of our emotions, and how do they adapt us to our environment? How did this mechanism evolve? And why does our human emotional experience seem so much more complex than that of other animals?

What are emotions?

The primary purpose of our brain, indeed of any brain, is to feel; ‘thinking’ is an ‘add-on’.

Emotions provide an instinctual, high-speed mechanism for processing incoming sensory information. The resulting response focuses our attention, and enables us to make risk-reward assessments of our situation.

In most cases this happens extremely quickly, shifting our physiology and behaviour before the higher brain circuits have yet registered the trigger of this change. Whilst ‘moods’ can last for days, our experience of fear, for example, can arise in less than half a second.

Robert Plutchik's ‘wheel’ of eight basic emotions. Plutchik suggests that these basic emotions are biologically primitive, and are shared in modified forms across animal clades. Their role is to increase the reproductive fitness of the animal. They trigger behaviours with high survival value, for example fear results in the fight-or-flight response. Plutchick’s analysis implies that our human complex emotions are a mixture of these basic responses (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Robert Plutchik’s ‘wheel’ of eight basic emotions. Plutchik suggests that these basic emotions are biologically primitive, and are shared in modified forms across animal clades. Their role is to increase the r... moreeproductive fitness of the animal. They trigger behaviours with high survival value, for example fear results in the fight-or-flight response. Plutchick’s analysis implies that our human complex emotions are a mixture of these basic responses (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Comparative studies of humans and other mammals suggest that we share a repertoire of basic or ‘primary’ emotions. These reflexes allow us to respond rapidly to our changing circumstances. They keep us alive through the hazards of our day, manage the pace of our vital functions as we work and rest, and inform us instinctively about whom we can trust.

Opinions differ as to how best to define this emotional repertoire.

• Paul Eckman suggests that animals, particularly mammals, experience six basic emotions: fear, disgust, happiness, sadness, anger and surprise.

• To this list, however, Robert Plutchick adds trust and joy.

• In contrast, Rachael Jack, when analysing the emotional signals expressed in human faces, proposes we have only four primary feelings; happiness, sadness, fear/surprise (fast arousal) and anger/disgust (slower arousal).

• Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, studying humans, renders the full list simply as ‘love’ and ‘fear’, and suggests that all other experiences stem from these.

All agree, however, that these basic emotional responses are either positive or negative, and can vary in intensity from ‘mild’ to ‘very strong’.

In all cases, emotional responses are learned; mammals, vertebrates and even insects and other invertebrates imprint behaviours from their own direct experiences as well as observing others. This mechanism is highly flexible; an animal’s response varies according to the subtleties of its context.

A male lion (Panthera leo) guards a wildebeest carcass in the Serengeti desert.  A small increase in the population size of lion predators substantially increases the sense of risk, and hence avoidance behaviour, in their wildebeest prey.  As a result, they hide more and consequently forage less.  This, rather than direct predation, reduces their population growth and prevents them from overgrazing their habitat (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

A male lion (Panthera leo) guards a wildebeest carcass in the Serengeti desert. A small increase in the population size of lion predators substantially increases the sense of risk, and hence avoidance behaviour, in thei... morer wildebeest prey. As a result, they hide more and consequently forage less. This, rather than direct predation, reduces their population growth and prevents them from overgrazing their habitat (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

For instance the fear responses of wildebeest vary according to the perceived density of their lion predators. Low levels of fear prompt these prey animals to increase their grazing intensity and reduce the amount of time spent hiding. Intense fear, triggered by only a small increase in lion numbers, might cause them to stampede. Emotions, then, instinctively adapt an animal’s behaviour to its immediate circumstances.

How do we ‘feel’ these feelings?

When we ‘feel’ something, we become aware of the current state of our body. Brain imaging studies show that we operate an emotional response in our lower brain circuits a fraction of a second before signals reach higher processing centres in the frontal cortex, and we begin to ‘think about’ what is actually happening.

These lower brain centres control the autonomic nervous system. The latter comprises two networks: ‘sympathetic’ and ‘parasympathetic’. Their names, reflecting a historical view of these systems as being ‘in sympathy’ and ‘in opposition’ to feelings, are in practice misleading.

The anthropologist Stephen Porges suggests instead that we consider these opposing neural networks as giving us our ‘autonomic state’. We perceive this physiological body state and interpret it as a ‘feeling’.

The sympathetic system ‘turns up’ our responses during emergencies and in states of positive excitement and anticipation. In contrast, feelings of calm, happiness and trust are under parasympathetic control, and are delivered primarily via the vagus nerve. In combination, these two systems provide our bodily experience of emotions across a spectrum from fear to love.

The vagus is the longest nerve in the human body. It runs from the brain to many of the organs, including the heart, lungs, liver and gut. Vagal impulses to these organs produce physical sensations of well-being such as a warm expansion in the chest, along with feelings of compassion, gratitude, happiness and love.

This is also a ‘mixed nerve’, acting as an ‘information highway’. Sensory information from the organs and tissues return back to the brain via the vagus. In particular the heart and the digestive system keep us informed of the overall state of our body. Both of these organs have a certain degree of neural autonomy; the heart generates its own rhythm, and the enteric nervous system produces local nerve impulses that drive the rhythmical contractions of smooth muscles around the gut.

The heart has some 40,000 neurons (‘sensory neurites’).  These interconnect in the same manner as brain neurons and are sufficiently independent that Dr John Armour has referred to them as a ‘little brain’ in the body. This GIF shows how the heart ‘beats’ in response to its own nerve impulses.  Muscle contractions are triggered by signals from the heart’s neural ‘pacemaker’, the sinoatrial node, located in the right atrium chamber (shown here top left).   During calm autonomic states, the vagus nerve sends impulses to this node which inhibit the rate and magnitude of the heartbeat.  This stops abruptly when we experience sudden stress; the lack of inhibition allows the heart rate to increase rapidly even before the sympathetic system has generated an ‘arousal’ response in the body (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

The heart has some 40,000 neurons (‘sensory neurites’). These interconnect in the same manner as brain neurons and are sufficiently independent that Dr John Armour has referred to them as a ‘little brain’ in the... more body. This GIF shows how the heart ‘beats’ in response to its own nerve impulses. Muscle contractions are triggered by signals from the heart’s neural ‘pacemaker’, the sinoatrial node, located in the right atrium chamber (shown here top left).During calm autonomic states, the vagus nerve sends impulses to this node which inhibit the rate and magnitude of the heartbeat. This stops abruptly when we experience sudden stress; the lack of inhibition allows the heart rate to increase rapidly even before the sympathetic system has generated an ‘arousal’ response in the body (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

We often talk about ‘gut feelings’, or ‘getting to the heart of the matter’. The digestive system is a major sensory organ, monitoring our interactions with the world through the food we eat. Our gut bacteria produce the bulk of our body’s neurotransmitters, and make many signals that affect our mood and emotions.

The heart’s abundant sensory nerves monitor these and other signals, sending information about our body state back to the brain. These messages are carried by the vagus directly to the amygdala and other components of the limbic system. These circuits process the data from our organs into information about ‘how we feel’, and present this to our conscious awareness.

Do other animals feel what we feel?

The vagus nerve makes us aware of our body state. This is true for all mammals, and to an extent is all vertebrates.

Emotional states of calmness and trust are produced by the parasympathetic nervous system and in particular by vagus nerve activity. When sensory vagal fibres perceive a calm body state, they promote the release of oxytocin from the brain.

This peptide (a short protein) signal, known as the ‘bonding hormone’ in higher vertebrates, has two roles. First it acts as a ‘neuromodulator’, increasing the activity of the pleasure-promoting dopamine-sensitive neurons in the central nervous system. Second, released into the blood as a hormone, it calms our body organs and reduces the level of arousal triggered by fear.

The heart and gut monitor the effects of oxytocin, and relay this information back to the brain via the vagus. This completes a neuro-chemical circuit which keeps the brain’s emotional centres informed of the state of our bodies, and enables us and other mammals to feel how and what we feel.

Mutually grooming ponies at Turf Hill, New Forest, U.K. Oxytocin is produced in mammals by positive social interactions, such as affection between parent and offspring, and social grooming activities (Image: Jim Champion/Wikimedia Commons)

Mutually grooming ponies at Turf Hill, New Forest, U.K. Oxytocin is produced in mammals by positive social interactions, such as affection between parent and offspring, and social grooming activities (Image: Jim Champio... moren/Wikimedia Commons)

Oxytocin has many physiological roles in mammals including birth, nursing and the establishment of pair bonds. This signal is released in response to affection between parents and offspring and group activities such as grooming. It acts to increase the effect of dopamine-based nerve pathways and other pleasure-promoting neural circuits in the brain. In this way we learn to associate calm, shared social experiences with feelings of pleasure, safety, trust and ‘love’.

Social bonding is particularly intricate amongst the fruit-eating primates. Chimpanzees forage collectively for fruit, sharing the proceeds. Mutual grooming results in oxytocin production which provokes relaxation and pleasure in these animals. This promotes trust and cohesion within the tribe, enabling them to trust each other and cooperate with this task.

Juvenile mammals adopt the emotional response behaviours of their social group. Like us, they learn to associate the vagus-mediated bodily shift into a calm physiological state with the circumstances that accompany trust and safety. The feelings that we and other mammals feel when nursed by our mothers as infants help us to learn how to build strong social bonds and to engage in other forms of social intimacy.

The act of nursing, stroking and sharing body warmth, as experienced by the offspring of this lioness, causes a release of oxytocin in both mother and child (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

The act of nursing, stroking and sharing body warmth, as experienced by the offspring of this lioness, causes a release of oxytocin in both mother and child (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

In addition, humans can also experience more complex emotional states such as shame, guilt, and remorse. Our ability to experience these feelings is dependent upon our development of speech and language. To access our complex emotions and understand our feelings we draw upon specific words.

This is one reason why psychologists have traditionally considered that other animals do not have emotions. This opinion has changed; most researchers now believe that we share a basic emotional repertoire with all mammals. Unlike them, however, we cannot shut down our thoughts, and so we do not experience the simplicity of what they presumably feel.

How did these feeling responses evolve?  

All animals show what we can recognise as an emotional response, at least to ‘fear’. As the vertebrates evolved, the autonomic response system increased in complexity and the development of the vagus nerve network became more elaborate. This has permitted an increasingly sophisticated regulation of the heart and respiration; controlling oxygen uptake in turn determines the body’s metabolic rate.

Stephen Porges proposes that the vagus has evolved through three stages, producing three autonomic ‘subsystems’ which supersede each other in delivering an increasingly sophisticated neural control of the heart and circulation. These subsystems support the physiological responses required for three types of adaptive behaviour.

i Primitive vertebrates such as the hagfish make passive avoidance (‘freezing’) responses to fear. Their slow (unmyelinated) vagal fibres connect limbic centres in the brain to the gut, shutting down digestion to conserve energy.

ii Higher vertebrates have a two-component oppositional autonomic system comprising a stimulatory (sympathetic) and calming (parasympathetic) function. This enables active avoidance (‘fight or flight’) behaviours. The increase in blood pressure that results from increasing sophistication in this system gave support to elaborated lung tissues, permitting the transition of vertebrate life onto land.

iii Porges’ third stage involves the autonomic system of mammals and birds being adopted and subsequently modified through evolution into an emotional response system that facilitates rapid social communication.

Like other mammals, most of our emotional responses are also social signals. We learn these responses as children, initially from the adults in our environment. Our social group has shared signals which relate to the experiences encountered in our specific situation.

All mammals accumulate unique neural wiring in this way. Adopting the social and other behavioural responses of their tribe enables juveniles to imprint the reactions which they need to survive in their ecological setting.

Sensory inputs may not initially provoke emotional responses in our infants. As they learn to associate for instance the smell of rotting food with our emotional reaction, they too begin to respond to this stimulus with disgust, and avoid it as ‘dangerous’. Conversely our and other mammal infants quickly learn to associate the scent and sound of mother with safety and trust.

Meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Namibia.   These highly social mammals forage, play, rest and move as a single unit.  If one of their party notices something and stands in the ‘alert’ posture (as here) the whole tribe follow suit (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Namibia.These highly social mammals forage, play, rest and move as a single unit. If one of their party notices something and stands in the ‘alert’ posture (as here) the whole tribe ... morefollow suit (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Mammals and birds, the most emotionally sophisticated of vertebrates, also have the fastest nerve and muscle reactions. These rapid responses depend upon a stably regulated body temperature, which requires their autonomic system to maintain an adequate supply of food and oxygen to the muscles. These benefits are under the control of the autonomic nervous system. The increased basal rate of their metabolism, resting heart beat and respiration rate compared with other vertebrates is delivered by myelinated (insulated) fibres of their vagus network.

How have emotional responses enabled us to adapt?

Emotions trigger imprinting and deploying of strategic responses which tailor an animal’s behaviour to its specific survival needs. Higher vertebrates (just like some insects and other invertebrates) can perceive and adopt the behaviours of others in their environment. This enables effective behaviour strategies to spread within a local population. These various types of response are adaptations, and are selectable by evolution.

In the social vertebrates, birds and mammals, emotion has a further role; ‘feelings’ bond the tribe, building and maintaining close social interactions, making their group respond as a coherent unit. Here emotions function as a social mechanism enabling complex animal societies to function cooperatively. This has shifted their ecological unit of selection from individuals to groups.

The lordosis reflex is an ‘immobilisation response’, mediated by oxytocin. Many female mammals in season arch their back and stay still in response to her mate touching her flanks.  This makes it possible for the male to copulate with her.  This reflex is particularly obvious amongst all members of the cat family, but is of secondary importance in higher primates and has been lost in humans (Image: Tsassi jules faustin/Wikimedia Commons)

The lordosis reflex is an ‘immobilisation response’, mediated by oxytocin. Many female mammals in season arch their back and stay still in response to her mate touching her flanks. This makes it possible for the mal... moree to copulate with her. This reflex is particularly obvious amongst all members of the cat family, but is of secondary importance in higher primates and has been lost in humans (Image: Tsassi jules faustin/Wikimedia Commons)

Coupling the parasympathetic calming response with pleasure circuits produces a positive emotional state, such as experienced during our most intimate social interactions. Feeling safe to ‘keep still’ is also needed for pair-bonding and to allow for the physical proximity associated with seduction and passion.

Pair-bonding in mammals depends upon oxytocin and another closely-related peptide, vasopressin. Both sexes produce these two signals in varying amounts. Female mammals require a surge in oxytocin levels to bond with her mate, whilst her partner bonds in response to high vasopressin.

Stephen Porges believes that the vagus-mediated primitive, vertebrate ‘freezing’ response (fear-triggered immobilisation) has been co-opted in mammals for reproduction, nursing and pair bonding. He proposes that a synchronised release of oxytocin and vasopressin in combination could activate vagal and sympathetic responses in the body at the same time, generating an unique autonomic state of calmness with sexual arousal, supporting courtship behaviours which we might call ‘love’.

Great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) displaying to each other during a mating ritual.  The autonomic nervous system of birds has arisen independently of mammals, yet they are similarly able to regulate their heart rate, metabolism and body temperature.  As with mammals, birds show a range of social behaviours including territory defence, nest building, mutual feeding and grooming, and physical intimacy.  Many birds use courtship dances when pair-bonding.  They also can suffer from separation anxiety, and share parental chores (Image: Charles J. Sharp/Wikimedia Commons)

Great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) displaying to each other during a mating ritual. The autonomic nervous system of birds has arisen independently of mammals, yet they are similarly able to regulate their heart r... moreate, metabolism and body temperature. As with mammals, birds show a range of social behaviours including territory defence, nest building, mutual feeding and grooming, and physical intimacy. Many birds use courtship dances when pair-bonding. They also can suffer from separation anxiety, and share parental chores (Image: Charles J. Sharp/Wikimedia Commons)

Courtship bonds in mammals and birds compel both parents to work together to look after their offspring. The majority of all vertebrates die as young juveniles. The selectable ‘pay-off’ for high parental investment may be an improved survival of these animal’s offspring during their most vulnerable life stage. The emotional bonds between parents and their offspring are crucial in motivating these adults to deliver this intense protection and care.

In mammals the vagus connects with other mixed cranial nerves (the trigeminal, facial and glossopharyngeal nerves) to control the structures used to vocalise, and in primates, to coordinate the production of facial expressions. These signals, along with posture and movement, communicate an animal’s emotional state to others. In humans, these neural connections are particularly advanced, and coordinate the many muscles that enable us to speak.

As in mammal calls, the emotional content of our voices are still discernible. The information is transmitted through the ‘rhythm and music’ (the prosody) of our words and phrases. We unconsciously register the emotional state of others whilst our conscious awareness is preoccupied with the meaning of their words.

Pleasure-associated grooming linked to vagal coordination of the voice may have provided our primate ancestors with the means to ‘groom’ each other using vocal sounds. A form of ‘vocal grooming’ may have been later co-opted into what became human speech.

Is our human experience different?

We experience a much greater complexity of emotional states than other mammals. Our understanding of ‘how we feel’ is dependent upon using words to define these emotions to ourselves, and share them as ideas.

Emotions code the intensity of close kin relationships and bonding between all social mammals. Our differences lie in the way that words can redefine our experience. Words equip us to distinguish our feelings from those of others, and so better understand the content of our own and others’ actions. This allows us to ‘make sense’ of our experiences.

These bottlenose dolphins (Tursinops truncatus) have an enlarged ‘paralimbic lobe’, a brain region enabling social communication and socially relevant emotions in all mammals.  Their societies are socially sophisticated, and their elaborate learned call signals include what appear to be ‘names’.  Some researchers therefore suggest that “…dolphins may have social thoughts and feelings that we can only vaguely imagine.” (Steven Johnson, Mind Wide Open, p.225.). (Image: Dolphin Embassy/Wikimedia Commons)

These bottlenose dolphins (Tursinops truncatus) have an enlarged ‘paralimbic lobe’, a brain region enabling social communication and socially relevant emotions in all mammals. Their societies are socially sophistica... moreted, and their elaborate learned call signals include what appear to be ‘names’. Some researchers therefore suggest that “…dolphins may have social thoughts and feelings that we can only vaguely imagine.” (Steven Johnson Mind Wide Open p.225.). (Image: Dolphin Embassy/Wikimedia Commons)

Words are symbols. Unlike a picture or other sign, their meaning is not directly inferable. It is unclear whether human’s use of word symbols is absolutely unique. For example, dolphins use ‘signature whistles’ like names, to identify individuals in their pod. It is not clear however whether the repeated phrases of dolphins ever ‘tell a story’. In the human ‘tribe’, words such as ‘love’ are metaphors which elicit strong emotional responses when we think them. They engage us in a shared story about the idea they represent, bringing an even greater intensity to our emotional lives.

The emotional responses of animals are triggered by their external circumstances in the present moment. We can feel emotions in response to the contents of our thoughts in the absence of any direct external stimulus. We can, with equal ease, re-live both positive and negative past events, and even fear things which we may never directly experience, such as ‘snakes’, ‘bankruptcy’ or ‘terrorism’. These internally created stimuli can bring us heightened emotional responses of various kinds, from intense love to debilitating depression and anxiety.

The antidepressant Fluoxetine, also known as ‘Prozac’ act through serotonin neural circuits to produce an increase of dopamine in the brain.  The mechanism by which these drugs act is still poorly understood.  Prozac helps to relieve the feelings of anxiety and sadness in patients suffering from depression.  However it can also inhibit the experience of other, more desirable emotions (Images: Wikimedia Commons)

The antidepressant Fluoxetine, also known as ‘Prozac’ act through serotonin neural circuits to produce an increase of dopamine in the brain. The mechanism by which these drugs act is still poorly understood. Prozac ... morehelps to relieve the feelings of anxiety and sadness in patients suffering from depression. However it can also inhibit the experience of other, more desirable emotions (Images: Wikimedia Commons)

Antidepressants such as Prozac (Fluoxetine) ‘damp down’ our unwelcome emotional extremes by indirectly modifying the action of neural circuits using dopamine. This can bring a welcome reduction in the severity of depression and anxiety symptoms. The same effect however applies to all our emotional responses. Some users of antidepressants report side effects of ‘emotional numbness’, and feelings of isolation and emotional distance from others.

Whilst ‘love’ and other emotions may be (as Stephen Porges suggests), a ‘by-product’ of the mammalian autonomic nervous system, the act of ‘giving love’ structures our whole society. Human language enables us to define our personal emotional state with high accuracy, and to acknowledge its complexity in our conscious and collected awareness. We use words to describe our feelings, code meaning into our experiences, share those experiences with others. Through our words and stories, we are constantly inventing and reinventing ourselves.

“He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.” – Gabriel Garcia Marquez; Love in the Time of Cholera

Intense emotion in the face of musician Esperanza Spalding; Newport Jazz festival, 2008. Humans explore and express their emotions through many creative forms including words, poetry, music and dance (Ben Alman/Wikimedia Commons)

Intense emotion in the face of musician Esperanza Spalding; Newport Jazz festival, 2008. Humans explore and express their emotions through many creative forms including words, poetry, music and dance (Ben Alman/Wikimedi... morea Commons)

Human ‘love’ then, is an emotional response, a neurochemical body state, an addiction, a behavioural reflex, a motivation, a consequence, and an idea with a story of its own. It is visceral, yet finds expression through our minds, and we recognise it through our own and other’s actions. We receive it by giving it away, and welcome it by caring for ourselves and others. It is universal yet indefinable, we experience it when we share it, and in each of our relationships it finds its own, unique expression.

Conclusions

  • Emotions are a source of information about our immediate world; a fast mechanism for processing sensory information and providing us with a means of assessing our levels of ‘risk’, and ‘safety’. They result in rapid alterations in internal state, which have associated behaviours that are adaptive and assist with the survival of the animal.
  • Emotions are a flexible adaptive mechanism for adapting an animal’s behaviour to its world. These behaviours are learned from the ‘tribe’. They allow us (and other mammals) to learn from experience and make better adapted future responses.
  • We share a repertoire of ‘primary’ instinctual emotions with mammals. These responses may also be present in less sophisticated forms in more primitive forms of vertebrates, and indeed invertebrates. The sophistication of these responses appears to mirror the complexity of their sensory perceptions and neural networks.
  • In vertebrates, the physical aspects of emotion are mediated through the autonomic (instinctual) nervous system. Changes in ‘autonomic state’ are and perceived in the body as ‘feelings’.
  • The autonomic nervous system has evolved through three levels in the vertebrate clade, shifting the emotional response from a chemical (circulating hormone) mechanism to a neural process with two opposing functions (the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems).
  • The increased levels of sophistication of this vertebrate response system allow better control of body temperature, metabolic rate, and heart and circulation.
  •  In the mammals the vagus has a fast acting (myelinated) component providing rapid signals which control the heart and circulation, and consequently supporting the body to make rapid changes in movement.
  • The physiological shift associated with changes in emotional state has been co-opted and subsequently adapted in mammals to facilitate social communication and group bonding.
  • Human emotions have an additional level of complexity, thanks to a thinking capacity that allows us to use words to define our feelings, create thoughts and develop ideas. We relate to our internal thoughts as to any other aspect of our experience, by coding them with an emotional content.
  • Love and other feelings may arise an emergent property of the autonomic nervous system, yet the meaning of what we experience is ours to choose, and our story to tell.

Text copyright © 2015 Mags Leighton. All rights reserved.

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